G-Code INCOG vs. INCOG Eclipse (makeshift version – Super mojo riser on original INCOG)

This is actually a comparison of the original INCOG holster vs. a makeshift version of the INCOG Eclipse (using the Super MOJO riser on the original INCOG holster).

I’d like to still have the choice to add the magazine caddy, so I ended up not purchasing the new INCOG Eclispe holster (cannot attach mag caddy), but instead, I got myself a Super Mojo riser to put on the original INCOG, thereby trying out the clip position of the INCOG Eclipse. It is essentially an Eclipse, plus a little material (next to the front sight).


The Super Mojo riser on the original INCOG holster. Its basically the Eclipse with extra material next to where the front sight would be.

The main difference between the INCOG and the INCOG Eclipse is the position of the clip.

  • The original INCOG holster was designed to have two clips to the side, even though many people prefer to only use one clip.
  • The INCOG Eclipse holster was designed to use one clip at the center of the holster, along the slide.
(left) Super Mojo riser on original Incog. (right) Original Mojo riser on Incog.

(left) Super Mojo riser on original INCOG. (right) Original Mojo riser on INCOG.

After trying it out, I still prefer the original INCOG, and below I’ll detail why I prefer the original, but other people may prefer the Eclipse due to their position of carry and body type.

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Adding more retention to the HSP INCOG holster

The HSP INCOG holster is a very good holster. Out of the five holster I’ve tried to use with my M&P Shield, it is the one I put on my belt the most (with the Phlster Access being a close second). However, one thing that I wasn’t entirely satisfied with the INCOG was the retention. It was a little too loose even when I’ve tightened the retention screw to its max.


I decided to see if I could make some adjustment to get a little bit more retention. Apparently, a very small mod saves the day 🙂

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Stippling M&P full-size – How to prepare, practice and go for it!

I have previously stippled the detachable backstrap of the M&P9 with a soldering iron. It added some grippiness to the gun, but one a big portion of the M&P9 that is part of my “grip” is still very smooth (e.g., the portion that meets the meaty part of the palm). So I finally went for the full frame with a wood burner (fine tip).

Scale pattern on the backstrap done using soldering iron tip

Scale pattern on the backstrap done using soldering iron tip

For the ‘scale’ pattern that was used for the M&P backstrap, the soldering iron did the job alright (picture above). However, I wanted a finer pattern for the actual frame. So I got a wood burner with several interchangeable tips. It is a $18 investment.

Before I decided to stippled the whole frame, I went with GT-5000 grip tapes. It added a bit of grip, but it was prone to shifting a bit and still not as grippy as I would like to be. So I figure I’ll go for stippling the whole gun.

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Installing the APEX Forward Set Sear (FSS) Trigger Kit with no prior gunsmithing experience

Disclaimer: This is my experience in the installation of the trigger kit. It worked well for me, but there is always a risk in modifying your own gun. Bring it to a gunsmith if you just want a nice trigger. If you enjoy understanding more about you gun, develop skills to diagnose and work on it, this is actually a good progress to go through yourself.

Installing APEX FSS.

Installing APEX FSS as a beginner?

So if you are wondering if it is possible to install the Apex Forward Set Sear (FSS) Trigger Kit without any prior gunsmithing experience, I’m going to say yes.  If you can be careful, understand instruction, decent with tools (e.g., using a punch, vice), then it should go relatively smooth. Prior to installing the trigger kit, I have zero experience in gunsmithing. The most I’ve done with my gun was simple cleaning and some stippling of the back strap. I have never even detail stripped my gun before thinking about installing the FSS trigger kit into my full size M&P9.

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Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for Beginner Handgun Class?

In the Haley Strategic D5 Handgun class, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) were optional but recommended. The list of PPE were as follow: “Gloves, knee pads, elbow pads, helmet, body armor optional but recommended“. So since it was optional, I wasn’t entirely sure what I should bring from that list, if any at all.

It is a common mistake among novices of any kind to over invest into too many gears they don’t really need at their level. We read a blog about the top 10 essentials for activity X, or a review of best-whatever for activity Y. This is why I appreciate posts that target beginners and let them know what they could take a pass on until things get more serious.

Being a researcher, it is my inclination to read every blog and watch every videos about what I’m currently interested in. And suffice to say, I –almost– fell into the trap of buying a lot of things I don’t need. I stopped myself. There is no way I need body armor or helmet for a basic handgun course…scratched those two. (I understand active military/LE might chose to train in all their gear. That makes sense to me. But for a civilian, especially a beginner, simple is probably best.)

The question was, do I need gloves and knee/elbow pads?

I ended up getting a pair of SKD PIG gloves (black) and using a pair of old boxing gloves as my makeshift knee pads.


PIG Full Dexterity Tactical Alpha Touch Gloves (black, size S)

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[Review] IWB Holsters, the HSP INCOG vs. PHLster ACCESS

If you search “appendix IWB holsters” on the internet, you will surely encounter the G-Code HSP INCOG and the PHLster ACCESS/Skeleton. I decided to get both, and decide which one I might like better. I picked the ACCESS over the Skeleton because I prefer a shirt guard for my holsters.

* Keep in mind that the comfort of carry is quite subjective, and different body-types would find different holsters more comfortable or not.
* Also, PHLster focuses on making holsters for Glocks and M&Ps. If you have a handgun from another manufacturer, AND live in the Philly area, you could possibly go to their workshop and have a custom holster make for your handgun.
* For a comparison between the INCOG and the INCOG Eclipse (mod version), read this post.


Left: HSP INCOG (half guard, 1 belt-clip only); Right: PHLster ACCESS + ITW Snap hook for keys.

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First time stippling – M&P backstrap

I wanted to make my full-size M&P 9 more “grippy”. Previously, I’ve used grip tape to achieve a more grippy effect. They work fine on flatter surfaces, but the more contour part of the gun is difficult to to make the tape stay in place. A bit of googling led me to the idea of stippling the polymer frame of the gun.

In short, stippling is using hot iron to melt patterns onto the polymer frame of the gun to give it a rougher surface, which increases friction, thus creating a more grippy feel. Stippling the whole frame of the gun is time consuming and irreversible. Since I had no experience in stippling, I was hesitant on making irreversible changes to my gun. The good thing is, the M&P 9 has a removable backstrap, which also happens to be the part of frame that I wanted the most improvement on in terms of adding more grip -over grip tape-.

A cheap investment of $6 gets me an extra backstrap that I can stipple without the fear of irreversible mistakes (I can always get another backstrap and do it again!)

Scale pattern on the backstrap done using soldering iron tip

Scale pattern on the backstrap done using soldering iron tip

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Modifying HSP INCOG Holster Mag Caddy

Spare magazine significantly higher than the end of the slide.

Spare magazine significantly higher than the end of the slide.

The INCOG mag caddy is a good addition to the INCOG holster for carrying an extra magazine right next to the holster. It essentially fills the “gap” that is created between the pant and your waist beside the holster (see image below).

Gap on the left of the holster between the pants and the body. Perfect spot for a an extra mag.

Gap on the left of the holster between the pants and the body. Perfect spot for a an extra mag.

Since the mag caddy fits between a gap that already existed, it didn’t increase any discomfort on the waist band. However, the height of the magazine riding in the mag caddy is significantly higher than the end of the slide, which digs into your gut when sitting down (see top image).

Solution: Move the caddy down one slot. However, another comfort problem occurred when moving the caddy down. The end of the mag caddy sticks out about half a centimeter and digs into my thigh.

I figure since I really like the height of the magazine with the mag caddy in its 1-lower position. The end of the mag caddy just has to go. Out comes the dremel.

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[Review/AAR] Consolidated Training Group – Combative Vehicle and Force-on-Force

Force-on-Force combative simunition class held by CTG


This past Saturday, I got to participate in a combative vehicle and force-on-force simunition class hosted by the Consolidated Training Group (CTG), a DFW based training group in defensive carry utilizing both live-fire training and force-on-force scenarios using Simunition FX man-marking ammo.


Handguns and rifles converted to shoot Simunition FX


The day lasted from 9am-5pm, with a 50 minute lunch break. Live-fire in the morning and scenarios using fx rounds in the afternoon. Since it is a ‘vehicle’ class, both the live-fire in the morning and scenarios in the afternoon revolves around the use of firearm in AND around a vehicle (e.g., use of vehicle as cover/concealment).

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